I Miss Sylvia Plath

Good morning everyone, in sticking with my Saturday Poem sharing I present my favorite Sylvia Plath poem, The Colossus. The poem was released in 1960 as part of a collection called The Colossus and Other Poems. The collection stands as the only selections of poetry Sylvia published before her death at age 30 in 1963.

The poem is full of wonderful imagery that was a hallmark of her work, she had a way of telling you something in her poem but also leaving it to the reader’s own interpretation. My favorite line is ” I crawl like an ant in mourning”

Sylvia was prolific in her short 30 years on the planet, I’d invite you to grab a cup of coffee and pull it close and enjoy this poem and then search out more of her work, she also published a novel, The Bell Jar that has a place among the best American literature. Have a great day and keep reading.

The Colossus

I shall never get you put together entirely,
Pieced, glued, and properly jointed.
Mule-bray, pig-grunt and bawdy cackles
Proceed from your great lips.
It’s worse than a barnyard.
Perhaps you consider yourself an oracle,
Mouthpiece of the dead, or of some god or other.
Thirty years now I have labored
To dredge the silt from your throat.
I am none the wiser.
Scaling little ladders with glue pots and pails of lysol
I crawl like an ant in mourning
Over the weedy acres of your brow
To mend the immense skull plates and clear
The bald, white tumuli of your eyes.
A blue sky out of the Oresteia
Arches above us. O father, all by yourself
You are pithy and historical as the Roman Forum.
I open my lunch on a hill of black cypress.
Your fluted bones and acanthine hair are littered
In their old anarchy to the horizon-line.
It would take more than a lightning-stroke
To create such a ruin.
Nights, I squat in the cornucopia
Of your left ear, out of the wind,
Counting the red stars and those of plum-color.
The sun rises under the pillar of your tongue.
My hours are married to shadow.
No longer do I listen for the scrape of a keel
On the blank stones of the landing.

Stopping for Death with Emily D.

Good Saturday to you all, today I’ll share another of my favorite poems with you. It’s Because I Could Not Stop For Death by Emily Dickinson. This poem was published in 1890 after Emily’s death. She was not a known poet in her life time, she came for a very wealthy family that were apparent pillars of the community. Emily was often thought of as ecentric and probably a little weird which makes you love her even more. She was known to wear mostly white and keep to herself and write. As she grew older she about became a complete recluse and rarely left her room. When she died her younger sister found 1800 poems that Emily had written. She was first published posthumously in 1890 by some acquaintances, although grossly over edited from the original work. Emily didn’t title her poems, and her puncuation and sentence structure was wild and free roaming. Her early publishers didn’t trust her instinct and I assume they mansplaned editing and poetry and made some cash selling bastardized, but still great poetry. Scholar Thomas Johnson would find and return Dickinson’s work to her original writing and publish a collection as she intended in 1955.

Here is my favorite Emily Dickinson poem as she intended, Number 479.

Because I could not stop for Death – (479)

Because I could not stop for Death –
He kindly stopped for me –
The Carriage held but just Ourselves –
And Immortality.
We slowly drove – He knew no haste
And I had put away
My labor and my leisure too,
For His Civility –
We passed the School, where Children strove
At Recess – in the Ring –
We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain –
We passed the Setting Sun –
Or rather – He passed Us –
The Dews drew quivering and Chill –
For only Gossamer, my Gown –
My Tippet – only Tulle –
We paused before a House that seemed
A Swelling of the Ground –
The Roof was scarcely visible –
The Cornice – in the Ground –
Since then – ’tis Centuries – and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses’ Heads
Were toward Eternity –

Let’s look at The Mending Wall.

Hello everyone and good morning. The birthday of my favorite poet, Robert Frost was celebrated this past, last week of March so I thought we’d take a look at one of his poems, The Mending Wall.

It was one of Frost’s earlier poems published in 1914. It’s about two farmers and their annual spring meet up to repair the stone wall the separates their respective properties. The narrator is unsure if a wall is really needed feeling that it keeps people apart. The neighbor quotes the ideology of his father that “good fences make good neighbors.” Here’s the poem and happy Easter weekend to you all.

The Mending Wall

Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun;
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs.  The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of outdoor game,
One on a side.  It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors.'
Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
'Why do they make good neighbors?  Isn't it
Where there are cows?  But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offense.
Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That wants it down.'  I could say 'Elves' to him,
But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
He said it for himself.  I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father's saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, 'Good fences make good neighbors

Halo Tactical Legendary Crate.

Hey folks, I received my second Halo Crate this week and it was awesome! Way better than my first one. You can find that earlier blog on the site if you wish. Let’s get started.

The theme of this crate was Tactical and featured heavily from Halo 2, my favorite Halo game.

The art created for the box focused on Sgt. Johnson. The UNSC Marine was also this months collector figure.

Very cool little guy in a neat post leaning on the Guilty Spark. He looks neat next to last boxes Master Chief.

We also got coffee mug that I assume Johnson would have loved. It has an “I ❤️ tanks” motif with the fun as hell to drive Scorpion. I’m bound to enjoy lots of coffee in that mug.

We also got the every box weapon pin, this time a Brute rifle.

Apparently there was a gold variant.

Now we get to what made the crate for me. I love the Arbiter, almost as much as Master Chief and we got to super cool items that celebrate Thel ‘Vadam. First we got these crazy cool socks that look like the Arbiter’s armor. The box even suggest walking on your tip toes like the Sangheili do. Hahaha

Love these socks! Love them so much I hate to wear them because I wanna have them forever.

Lastly we got the shirt, again very Arbiter specific, but it’s like a deep cut from one of your favorite bands.

It’s the Arbiter Mark of Shame he received at the beginning of Halo 2. Simple but iconic. Love it!

So just a fantastic subscription box from Loot Crate. The next box is in May and it’s Arena themed.

Playlist for Fictional People

So I have a little hobby of making up Spotify playlist for fictional characters from comics and movies. You’d be surprised by the number of folks that have curated collections of songs inspired by the likes of Spider-Man or Game of Thrones. I first heard the new Ice Cube song Good Cop, Bad Cop on a playlist dedicated to the Night King.

It’s fun for me when I get wrapped up in a story line or something to think what music a particular character would be listening to on the daily. My first playlist was for My Hero Academia teacher Shota Aizawa. I just heard songs that reminded me of his story and characterization. He somewhat disapproves of All-Mights bravado so the Kendrick Lamar track Humble was perfect.

I’m a huge fan of Marvel’s Ant-Man so I built one for him full of some cheesey moments, songs with a nod to science too.

If you type almost anything into Spotify search you’re gonna probably get a hit. I found a Castlevania playlist with almost 8 hours of music from the classic video game franchise, including 8-bit renditions and heavy metal versions of the iconic music as well.

My favorite that I’ve been working on is dedicated to Jean Grey and her recent story line from then Phoenix Returns Saga. Issue 11 of the Young Jean Grey and the new launch of X-Men Red was just exciting and I wanted some tunes to capture the new directions for the classic Marvel Comics character.

So checkout some of this stuff on your Spotify or streaming service and build your own based on Fox Mulder or Garfield or whatever. Let me know and I’ll check it out. I even got the rest of the Mid-American-Culture staff on board for our weekly waves as we figure out what would be on Captain America’s iPod so watch out for that. Happy Saturday!