The Forgotten Namco Arcade Classic

Namco is one of the most successful video game companies to come out of Japan. Before they merged with Bandai, they created games such as Klonoa: Door to Phantomile, Tekken, and Soulcalibur. Arguably their most successful time, however, was the age of arcades in the 1980’s. Their lineup at the time was almost impossible to compete with. Pac-Man needs no introduction, Galaga is a legend, and Dig Dug is a personal favorite of mine. However, there is one game that everyone forgot about that I think needs more recognition. And my fascination with it came from a product of a fad in the 2000’s. Continue reading “The Forgotten Namco Arcade Classic”

Boring Video Games Are Awesome

Earlier in the week, I couldn’t sleep, so I did what I normally do when this happens: I binge watched YouTube videos. My YouTube adventures led me to a gameplay video of a game called House Flipper. On the surface, this game sounds very intriguing. To be fair, it is very intriguing. However, it wasn’t what I expected it to be. The first stages of the game consist of your character starting a house flipping business. Your humble beginnings lead you to take jobs cleaning houses, painting rooms, etc. The gameplay that I watched can be described only as tedious. You quite literally go through and mop the house, physically pick up the trash, wipe down the windows, and use a paint roller to add color to the rooms of the houses. When I describe this to you, you’re probably thinking that this sounds boring as all hell. In a way, you’re right. It is boring. It is tedious. On the flip-side though, there is something so addictive and charming about it. Putting in all of that hard work and seeing the results of a clean and beautiful house is extremely rewarding. As you progress through the game, you undoubtably find more and more interesting and fun things to do to these houses, eventually buying your own and flipping them for a profit. This game, among other PC classics have really made me want to get a gaming PC, just to share in the experience. Not too long ago, I also downloaded Roller Coaster Tycoon (a childhood favorite of mine) onto my laptop. Obviously, it doesn’t run as well as it does on a desktop computer, but it sent me on a nostalgia trip I can only liken to visiting your old school or your childhood house. I felt right at home in the game. These minimally exciting, but yet intriguing games are awesome and I hope that this recent experience has rekindled my love of such games. I encourage everyone to check out this game, or at the very least some gameplay of it, so that you can experience it’s strange, almost boring charm. I will link some gameplay below. That’s all for this week. Thanks for reading. Check out some of the other great content on Mid-American Culture while you’re here. See you next week!

View House Flipper gameplay here!

A Must-Watch YouTube Series: Defunctland

I’m sure most of us have fond memories of amusement parks, whether it be at the Happiest Place on Earth, school field trips to Camden Park, or thrilling visits to Cedar Point or Kings Island. Recently, my brother and fellow Mid-American Culture contributor Chase introduced me to a YouTube channel that produces videos about various amusement park attractions that are no longer in operation, or cease to exist entirely. That channel is called Defunctland, ran by Kevin Perjurer, and I’ve been watching tons of those videos lately, so I thought I’d share some of them with you all today.

Continue reading “A Must-Watch YouTube Series: Defunctland”

Weekly Waves 42: Music from the Tony Hawk Games

This week’s playlist is curated by @caedwards99 and is based around music from the soundtracks for the Tony Hawk video game series.

Bring Back NCAA Football Games

Today, I will be briefly ranting about two things near and dear to my heart: football and video games. More specifically, I will be talking about NCAA Football video games. NCAA 14 was the last college football game released by EA, do to licensing disputes and a plethora of other issues. At the time in which the games were still coming out, I wasn’t an exceptional fan. I liked them, I always purchased them, but with the exception of 2012, I always preferred Madden games to their NCAA counterpart (Madden 12 was awful). However, I recently started watching a YouTube gaming channel which featured an NCAA 14 Dynasty series, which hit me right in the nostalgia spot. So, for the first time in years, I hooked up my old Xbox 360 and played some NCAA 13. I ended up not buying NCAA 14 for whatever reason, so I made do with what I had. I was immediately enthralled by the game. I had forgotten just how in-depth and fun the Dynasty mode was. I absolutely love the recruiting process and I find it to be just as fun, if not more so, than the actual games themselves. The nature of college football forces players to constantly be looking to the teams future, as you have a maximum of 5 seasons at most with any and all in-game players. Currently, I am going into my 4th season as head coach of my local team, the Marshall University Thundering Herd. I hold an immaculate record, having lost only 4 games in those 3 completed years (playing on Heisman difficulty, of course). I have both a Rose Bowl and Orange Bowl victory, and two C-USA Championships to show for my success. I’m pressing on in my dynasty, not feeling the slightest hint of exhaustion or boredom toward the game. This has led me to raise the question of why in the world the NCAA and EA Sports have not revived this series. The game is exceptional. I obviously don’t have exact figures, but I’m 100% certain that the NCAA Football series made millions of dollars for EA. It undoubtedly exposed a significant amount of people to college football, to the benefit of the NCAA. Surely the two sides could reach an agreement on a way to bring the series back. On top of that, the game could be heavily beneficial to the players themselves. I have always been a strong supporter of paying college athletes. While I do not believe that they should receive any compensation outside of a scholarship from the school’s themselves, the players should be able to monetize their likeness, in the form of profiting from their respective jersey and merchandise sales, as well as actual usage of their likeness in things like the NCAA Football video game series. The reintroduction of the game could be the best possible way to ensure a higher quality of life for both college athletes and causal video game players. The series has provided me with countless hours of fun, and continues to do so, despite the last rendition of the game being 5+ years old. The revival of the game could help bridge the gap between the millions of dollars made by the NCAA and the lack of compensation for college athletes. Bringing back the game would be a win-win-win situation for the NCAA, collegiate athletes, and video game players alike. In my opinion, this is something that really, really needs to happen. I hope to one day be able to turn on my new-generation gaming console and again be able to enjoy the fun of the college football experience, sooner rather than later.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to check out some of the other great content from the writers at Mid-American Culture. Thanks for reading!